About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 18
CSPAN2 10
CNNW 8
MSNBCW 7
FBC 3
CNBC 2
CNN 2
MSNBC 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 72
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 72 (some duplicates have been removed)
. europe has also been a blend of red and green as the ft names ecb chief the person of the year. we're going to kick off with breaking news. for that would, we go to david faber. >> news on best buy, in the news yesterday. the stock up sharply. what we can tell you right now is the board of directors of best buy, and its founder, richard schultz, has been trying to put together a group to essentially buy the company in a go private transaction, have extended the deadline in which he would need to come with a bid for best buy and created a window in fact that will begin on february 1st next year and end with the end of that month on february the 28th. giving schultz the opportunity to look at not just christmas sales, but the end of their fiscal year, which will end at best buy on the 31st of january. and that window, again, will be 28 days long giving him an opportunity to continue to try to cobble together a bid with private equity firms and those who might finance a potential bid for the company at whatever price that might come at, if it were in fact to come at all. no word in te
morning. all right. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washing
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago. but i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america, because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that is broad based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globe balance leave. globally and i think we can get the kind of cycle that all of us have been waiting for and want to see. what is holding us back right now ironically is a lot of stuff that is going on in this town. and i know that many of you have come down here to try to see, is there a way that we can breakthrough the logjam and go ahead and get things done? and i'm here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know that you've got even a lot of briefings, let me just try to describe where the situation is right now with respect
are iran and eastern europe. in iran jimmy carter helped topple the shah of iran and then stood back and did not help the new rebel government to set it sell up as self governing group and the ayatollah came in and shoved aside the well meaning democrats and set up an islamist state. look at fall of the reagan wall, when that happened we sent in people to help. we sent in bookkeepers and political experts to show them how to run the political parties and say this is how free media works but just gave them the tools. so iran, the greatest threat to world peace today. and, eastern europe, america's greatest ally. >>neil: very interesting. thank you very much. i almost forgot k.t. was speaking, the world is going to end tomorrow. did nut worry. that is when the mayans say we should be ready to say goodbye. hold off on that mortgage payment. second, take a look at what a lot of survivallives are spending their money on instead. >> they have always predicted the end of the world. >> i have a good feeling about this, sweetheart. hi. i'm henry winkler. and i'm here to tell homeowners that a
borrowing like this or we will have the same problems that europe is having. that is one of the frustrating things. they are not theoretical. that's not a classroom exercise. you can look at europe and see what happens if we continue down this path very much longer. >> alex rid man bill clinton's budget director put the bulk of the spending problems on the promises to medicare medicaid and lesser extent social security. >> they will drive federal spending occupy faster nan our economy can grow. revenues won't keep up. we have a problem. if you don't have enough revenues to pay for the spending you have to borrow. on the track that we are on if we go on doing what is in the law over the next several decades, our public debt will rise fast you are than our economy will grow. when that happens you have real problem. you have to pay interest on that debt and creditors see that your debt is rising faster than your economy is growing so they charge more and more. it is a very bad situation. >> arthur brooks with the american enterprise institute finds sur rent debates about higher taxes misguided
from its oil exports. 9% of which are purchased by europe. president bashar al-asaad ruled for 12 years after assuming the presidency under questionable circumstances can argue. regime allies aloud him to take office at 32 years old. he was approved by a voter referendum of yes or no. martha: he rarely appears in public. january 11 he addressed a public rally in the capital city of damascus. after that march 27 he visited a former rebel stronghold to allegedly inspect the conditions there. his most recent appearance on june 3, he spoke before syria's parliament. we covered it here on fox. in that speech he denied reports his government massacred rebel fighters and civilians and he accused foreign terrorists of plotting to destroy his country. bill: . the government moving defense missiles to turkey. it will be defensive posture only. the western alliance is set to okay those weapons. the patriot missiles not expected to arrive in turkey until next month. martha: let's go to egypt which is also very volatile at the moment. the presidential palace is looking like an armed palace. they sta
. >> they were comfortable, yes. >> what inspired rob cox two, six months before, go off to europe? >> well, this is one of the questions that fascinate me when i started researching the book. he was an idealistic young man. i knew that. he went to a school that, a christian school, and he was somewhat religious and felt that life was meant to be at more than just yourself, and to have meaning and be helpful to others, that kind of thing. there were a few less noble motivations i think. he was graduated from college. he had no other obvious plan, and yet what we would now call a low draft number. he knew that it was a good chance you'll be drafted drafted into the american army, which had resumed the draft in come at the end of 1940. but had no clear plans to actually go to war, and he wasn't too excited i don't think about spending the next couple of years training for military. so he was casting around for something, and i think this fulfill a lot of meaningful, fulfilled a lot of meaningful goals for him. >> how did he get from harvard to england? i mean, who did he contact? >> that's a
that whirlwind trip through europe. i was along with her on that. and it was quite a hectic scheduled. after that, the stomach bug, which others had, also, on the trip. overcame her, and she suffered this concussion. it's not clear when she's capitocoming back. >> margaret, even people in the billion don't know. even people at the top levels of that department are also getting their news from the statements, know very little about what she's doing, how she's doing. and what a twist for her. this amazing run, unquestioned praisefor four years, and all of a sudden this bad report, sort of weird absence, politico today reporting that chelsea clinton troops in take a higher role in the next months. she's been doing some charity work through the clinton foundation sandy recovery. > recovery. >> schieffer: what is she going to do? is she going to run for something, too? >> a lot of democrats hoped she would run fair congressional seat. we're told that's not the case. but she'll be out there sort of as the clinton face, as-- >> this lack of disclosure i think is trouble responsible i really do think the
in eastern and central europe that are struggling to not only become members of the european union, but to join the north anti-ic treaty organization because they -- atlantic treaty organization because they are still seek a chance to be free from that kind of repression. i'm reminded what took place during the 2008 olympics, summer olympics, in georgia when we saw the incursion from putin's russia into georgia over the break away regions, and we continue to see lots of threats. it is a very dangerous world. very dangerous world. tragically, plato said only the dead have seen the end of war. and i remember this, we saw the demise of the soviet union, the kremlin, berlin wall, many of us did believe, and it was famously wrote about the end of history believing that political pluralism, rule of law, and self-determination, and democratic institutions would thrive all over the world. well, it hasn't quite worked out that way in the last couple of decades. and we all know what the consequences of those threats have been for the first time ever. we had the kind of attack we did on septe
opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for their intellectual property and our farmers will have new tools to fight unscientific trade barriers. if we pass pntr, american exports to russia are expected to double in five years. this bill has strong enforcement provisions to help ensure that american farmers, ranchers, businesses and exporters get the full benefit of pntr. and this bill has strong human rights provisions. senator cardin's magnitsky act punishes human rights violations in russia and helps to address the corruption problems russia now faces. in july
leigh syria. >> bret: james rosen, thank you. more bad economic news for europe. central bank cut its forecast for economic growth next year from plus half percentage point to minus . .3 of a point. greece's unemployment rate rose to 26% in september. at home, wall street had a good day. the s&p 500 was up five. nasdaq finished up 15.5. coming up shortly, alan simpson on what motives 81-year-old senator has to dance gangnam style now. that president obama has been re-elected is he going to wage a war on coal? initiated. neural speeds increasing to 4g lte. brain upgrading to a quad-core processor. predictive intelligence with google now complete. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. and always have. so does aarp, an organization serving the needs of americans 50 and over for generations. so it's no surprise millions
in washington. everywhere else, go to paris, london, europe, the arab world, you read their press, and everybody knows, or everybody criticizes or accuses the obama administration as being a partner as pushing or helping the morsi government, and before that, the muslim brotherhood. it's a well-known reality. only in the hallways of the washington, political establishment, the question should be why? why did the obama administration from day one from tahrir square, rather than teaming with the youth, women, middle class, labor, and he sided with the muslim brotherhood, and that question basically, if we answer that question, we would know what would be the future of the policy in egypt. lou: eric, you cautioned against trusting morsi from the outset, and now, it appears, we are trying to persuade russia to end their support for assad. how effective do you think that ever will be? >> i think it will be very uneffective, and i'm afraid we waited way look on syria. 30,000 people have been killed. now reports of gas loaded on to bombs to be dropped # on them, and i think we really have to be very co
on the bloody battlefields in europe. and came back the most decorated and exercised something that was very important. they did it for their family certainly, but for the greater good because they loved america. they sacrificed themselves and many many perished on those fields and that is the kind of situation we are faced with now and those republicans can't seem to get it. they are so bull headedly when theed to their philosophy. we need to raise taxes to meet the crisis. and they would rather plunge down that cliff and plunge us into another economic catastrophe because the sequester is going to cancel the military contracts that we have and that means unemployment for many many years ahead. and all it takes is everybody rallying together and sacrificing a tiny bit. during what we enjoyed during the clinton jeers. lots of jobs being created. and cutti inting taxes creating has never been proved to be true. with the middle class maintaining the tax cuts, they are going to be spending money and creating jobs.
to be in great shape. >> we were on an airplane flying to europe, which we do every year, and we were up in a compartment just the two of us, and i woke up and it was just starting to get a little light. and i saw this figure with a shawl on and doing this mumbo jumbo, i thought maybe i had died. >> so then i said, when i tell the story, i say this is kind of man john mccain is. he things that heaven is populated by praying jews. what a guy. >> i had never known a person in my life that lives his religion to the degree that joe lieberman does. he's such a great contrast to people like me and lindsey because i've never seen him lose his temper. i've never seen him insult anyone, i've never seen him treat anyone but with the greatest courtesy. i cannot say that about lindsey or myself. >> your temper is legendary. >> very calm. >> very calm, level headed. >> absolutely. >> have you ever known him to not lose his temper? >> i just realized they do really -- >> 1973. >> they do a great service for me because i don't have to lose my temper, because they do it for me, they express it for me. y
in europe on the big 75% tax rate that the french wanted to pass for the rich. >> the breaking news that a french court said a 75% tax rate on individuals is unfair. so it has been rejected. the court court says unless you apply it to households it is not fair to single out individuals. that means 75% tax at this moment is not in effect. the french government and francois hollande says, it won't make any difference. we'll rewrite the law using new wording and we'll catch more people in the 75% tax rate net. heather: stuart varney, i know you have a lot of work to do today. it is a busy day financially. thank you. >> thank you. gregg: what will it mean if lawmakers fail to strike a deal? according to the tax policy center 90% of the americans would see a tax hike in 2013. 121 million people will be paying a whole lot more in payroll taxs. those are social security payroll taxs. families making between 40 and $65,000 a year will have to pay an extra two grand to the u.s. government. the more you make, boy, that number really accelerates. heather? heather: another devastating blow in t
of a gene use. jen use. it might make them so powerful no one in europe can stand up to this em. a century from now is not my problem. the news goes back. they take the news of the purchase back. the news arrives in boston. boston is the federalist tear toy. it's the opposition for the jefferson administration. that want to deprive jefferson of try yumple. they set off a fireworks display. it wasn't a controversial thing in american politics. no. american politicians were really enthusiastic about this. news gets to washington, and the senate starts to debate the ratification of this and the only nature of the obstacle arises jefferson himself lead him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire a territory. and he starts to hem and haw say we need a constitutional amendment to give the government the power. napoleon back in france had overthrown the government. he was not exactly -- >> host: constitution nap. >> guest: yeah. not repressed by the argument. he started make noises saying i'm going revoke the treaty. madison, our baseline alternative comes to jeff
, europe, the european union was fractured by debt and the plans to fix it. that saga is far from over. >>> number three, the housing market, finally, finally bottomed out. the combination of home prices and continued mortgage rates set off a building and buying spree. well-he well-heeled investors began to buy entire neighborhoods. and homeowners got more with a hefty down payment. >> and cnn predicts that barack obama will be reelected president of the united states. >> the election, more than just about obama and romney, more about socialism, and capitalism and spending, about the role government should have in your life. >> number one is the fiscal cliff. lawmakers saw it coming, but didn't bother to pay any attention to it until after the election. had they put politics aside and dealt with it earlier, who knows how strong the u.s. economy would be right now. >> up next, children in need of a home are caught in the middle of a dispute over human rights. and we'll meet one man reaching into his own pocket to help america ease its enormous debt. [ male announcer ] rocky had no idea
of legislators. i will close with this -- we have a different form of government than they have in europe. this is not a parliamentary system. in a parliamentary system, one government rules everything. one party rules everything. you have the prime minister, you have the speaker, and the leader. all in one party. and then it you do not compromise -- you put that out there and you get your program through. if there is a lack of confidence the people can change parties. the next party comes in and does what it wants. that is not what we do here. sometimes i wish it was the form of government we have because at least there would be some action and you would now. you would not have some uncertainty -- each party has its dreams and hopes and plans. they would have to change to get this policy through. we have to meet each other halfway. the house is run by the republicans. is -- the senate is run by the democrats but is not a super majority. the president is a democrat. we have to work together. that is the name of the game. if we can do it on the highway bill -- if they can do it on the farm
security. in latin america, in africa, in europe and elsewhere. the past decade of war has reinforced the lesson that one of the most effective ways to address long-term security challenges is to help build the capabilities of our allies. we have seen this approach with our counterinsurgency campaigns and iraq and afghanistan, and our counterterrorism efforts in yemen and somalia. we are expanding our security forces assistance to a wider range of partners in order to address a broader range of security challenges in asia-pacific, in the middle east. and as i said, in europe, africa and in latin america. to implement this element of the strategy, the services are retaining the security cooperation capabilities we have honed over a decade of war. and making investments in regional expertise. for example, for the armies new structure, they are able to, in fact, engage on a rotational basis to assist other countries. the entire u.s. government is working to make our security cooperation, particularly for an military sales, more responsive and more effective, to cut through the bureaucrac
are here for an orientation day and would like you to talk with them. now, law in europe is undergraduate. very few countries in the world have a graduate law school system. but england, europe, the law is undergraduate. these orientation students were basically high school seniors ready to enter the freshman year of college. and so i talked with them. there was a room smaller than this, maybe 80 people. i'm justice kennedy here to tell you about the supreme court. and we started talking and the student raised her hand and said, now, checks and balances are very important in your constitution and the president checks the congress and the congress checks the president, who checks the courts? good question. we talked about that. i'm not sure i had a satisfactory answer. there is an answer but -- and another student raised his hand and said, now, federalism is very important in america but money goes to washington and then goes to the states with conditions with. and doesn't this undermine federalism? we talked about that. then a student raised their hand and said chief justice john marshall
a sense of europe, perhaps real countries, germany, finland, each with different points of view, but also all with the common view that they have to find a way to work out their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it, feel it, -- listen to the words. they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us for leadership. europe chose the danger of uncertainty. we all know that. we all know the uncertainty that exists in this country. uncertainty leaves businesses sitting on the sidelines. it drags down investment and economy into the capital. companies will postpone decisions the next quarter. maybe they will not hire, not do what they would like to do. we cannot leave people wondering what is coming down the pike every few months. confidence matters. it especially matters in our economy. once we resolve the cliff, we need long-term fiscal reduction so that businesses can climb to the future. to get families and businesses certainty, we must agree in the next few weeks on specific spending cuts and specific revenue increases that reduce the d
. >> driving while high, while legal research shows more drivers are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana effects coordination and judgment. >> one of the first and most important being reduced ability to divide one's attention. >> pot is far left debilitating than argue many argue. new canadian study say those who drive within three hours of smoking pot are twice as likely to cause a crash. >> another we see driving under the influence of marijuana reduce the ability to perceive time and distance. >> how much is too much? >> i don't absolutely feel that we are on uncharted territory. i know we are for a fact on uncharted territory. >> severe level for pot in washington state where marijuana is now legal. the limit is 5 nano grams per blood sample. equal to alcohol. >> because we are still early on in the research stage, it's very difficult to determine whether or not that five than gram standard will change. similar to how the dui standards have evolved over the years. >> the problem is heavy users, though not impaired, can test positive weeks after smoking. also,
're getting cool in the later years. >> all right, zach, let's move on. first of all europe's stocks are having are very good run. in fact stocks almost all around the world are having a very good run. they ain't doing too badly here in the usa. fiscal cliff or not. what do you make of that? >> first of all, we obviously see these things in terms of one-year period. if you add up january 1 of 2011 through let's say december 31st, 2012, a two-year period, let's say the markets end up a little bit more they're still going to be up about 8% annualized for two years. which is a really good compared to 1 1/2% on a 10-year note. but hardly what you would call this massive bull market a la the 1990s and 1980s. >> it's nice. but zach, if i could have had 8% a year for the last 15 years, you have to be in better shape than how i actually am. in the last 15 years it hasn't done anything. >> i think this is a testament to the fact the only game in town, you do talk about this a lot, larry, is that companies are net net relative to national economies better run and making money. so if you're goi
traveled to 15 countries over the last four years. i told these companies that built the rails in europe and asia, come to america. invest in america. many of them are here now. in the absence of congress not providing the money but the leadership of the president's providing the money, we would get there with public money. until we do, we will use private dollars. >> with all respect, there is not 50 minutes worth of vision in this congress. the chairman likes to exclude himself. i very much respect and i believe it is the way to proceed not to give up on high-speed rail. i beg you not to get up. -- giv eup. e up. if you continue to flake this money out, it in the end there will be huge criticism of the administration for having nothing to show for a bond. above is a possible for you to think you're a fiscal priority based on a real time vision of what lies ahead for us in the next five years so that we might prioritized among these projects which for example have state go ahead. the projects were you see an opportunity for private sector funding. on some rational basis, we're going to
of central europe, particularly hungary, east germany and poland from 1944 to 1946, they tried to empty out the universities of historians and philosophers. and they were pretty effective at that. they got them to go west. as we know. or they exiled them in some way internally. in central europe, eastern europe as well. they encouraged more science and engineers, which is fifpblete but they weren't in a creative environment where they could do good work. democracy, as again the founders would have known this, you can't just be a science and engineer in a democracy to look way over the cliff to the mountains and beyond. so i'm very disturbed now to say that one great state university is talking about creating incentives for people to do science and engineering as undergraduates as against in effect creating disincentives for people to do humanities. you have to have people who can look beyond the current crisis. that also has been part of the american middle class, new ideas. >> i agree with that. i would like to see more of an emphasis on the science and math. i guess -- we are going to in
, in europe, in africa, in the caribbean, and in america, especially in america where it had the impact of radicalizing the abolitionist movement, and by that i mean that more and more people began to recognize that the resistance of enslaved people was crucial to abolition. they began during the time of the rebellion to quote a famous line from lord byron. this is repeated again and again and again running all the way up to the civil war, and that line was those who would be free must themselves strike the first blow. in other words, action from below can be a trigger. this had a very dramatic impact op a lot of leading african-american intellectuals like henry highland-garnett, frederick douglass and had a big effect on a man named john brown who wanted to strike the first blow at harpers ferry. i guess this is the final thought i leave you with. one of the most remarkable things about movements from below is that they are unpredictable. you never know when they are going to arise or how. these -- these things that rise up, these demands for justice, these demands for equality, these
actually make an equal comparison from us, to the countries of europe and around the world, we're actually at about 120% debt to gdp right now. and of course, that's internal/external, but the extre external debt, we're over 100 now. so we're in much better shape than when we talk about the problems that we have. so i'm willing to do it incrementally, willing to do it all as a big time. what i'm willing to do is solve the problem for the future of our country. so if we do that, and the more we do of it, the more we'll see economic growth start coming. i think we're primed for economic growth, but we have to solve these very real issues to be able to take advantage of the prime. >> i agree with you. i think the economy can take off and washington can get out of the way at this point. tom coburn, republican senator from oklahoma, thank you very much for being here. >> ezra, good to be with you. god bless you. >>> there is one way we can start to fix our dysfunctional congress, and guess what, they are actually thinking about doing it. which, of course, means now other congressmen are thinkin
to call eastern europe has become differentiated. it's no longer these countries no longer have much in common with one another except the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with the pulitzer prize winner ann on life in soviet east germany from the end of world war ii through 1956 from the historical narrative subtle night at 8:00 on c-span q & a. this hearing is an hour 45 minutes. committee will come to order. the oversight committee exist to secure two fundamental principles, first americans have a right to know that the money washington takes from them is well spent. and second, americans deserve an government that, woses for them. our duty on the oversight and governor reform committee is to protect the rights, our so lem responsibility is to hold government accountable to taxpayers. because taxpayers have a right to know what they get from their government. it's our job to work tirelessly as citizens watchdogs to deliver the facts to the american people and bring reform to the bureaucracy. our committee's resources are limited. but in one area, we have focused for m
in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to an independent in georgia, al. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get through. it was on the heels of you going to atlanta and to chast
that has happened since 1989 is the region we used to call europe has become very differentiated. they no longer have much in common with one another. >> more with anne applebaum sunday night at 8:00 p.m. on c- span's "q&a." next, grover norquist was on this morning's "washington journal." this is 40 minutes. host: someone who's been in the news and on the news lately is on your screen now, grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform. mr. norquist, make your case for no tax increases at this point in our economic situation. guest: two years ago president obama extended all of the tax cuts that lapsed in janurary. he did so because he said the economy was weak and raising taxes ordered. the economy is not any stronger now than it was. in addition to the tax increase, he wants to impose by letting some of the bush tax cuts laps, he has already got a trillion dollars in tax increases that starting in january to pay for obamacare. when you think about fiscal cliff, the bush tax cuts have collapsed, sequestration cuts spending, and then there's a trillion dollar tax increas
and the united states out of europe, i would imagine. megyn: i'm sorry to be obtuse. but when you say battery what do you mean? >> it's a missile battery. the element that fires the missiles and they have a command and control facility that guides the missile to the target and it's a fire control mechanism. so that's what we have got here. they will come out of three countries, germany, the netherland and the united states probably based out of urine. largely defensive. the turks are spooked about it activity surrounding the chemical weapons and the fact that the last year they have been dealing with rocket mortar attacks from syria and occasional air attack on their border. while some people will think they are overreacting and imposing article 5 of nato which every country has to commit itself to defend another member if they believe they are in peril. you can understand the turk's position given what's gone on the last year or so. megyn: are we send troops over there or sending people to deliver the batteries. >> i think we'll send some batteries ourselves as i understand. i'm fairly confi
, england and europe. and so the president ordered them built in 1940, but the navy, um, decided that that was probably not a good idea, so they convinced the president that the scarce resources that were available at that time would be better spent on destroyers. and i think that if, if you look at the historical record, you'll see that that probably was a mistake. .. it was built in the tampa shipyard. there were 563 destroyed air escorts built. seventeen shipyards all across the country. it actually came late in the game, like a lot of them. this is 1944. it did a few escort's back and forth across the atlantic. one interesting thing that the slater did do, the only nazi submarine, the only you-book captured by the americans and will work to was captured by destroyer escort. they get a treasure trove of material, conference of documents, actually a half a ton from this you -- u-boat 505. one of the torpedoes was loaded on to this letter and brought back to america for study along with the all important in the machine, and that was the codebreaking machine. and it actually was
, you showed those scenes of some violence where was it in east europe. we're seeing that in lansing, michigan, right now. you will see percent opposition by the unions to other states that try to go this direction. bill: we'll take that up next hour with a guest i just mentioned. one fine point on this. you believe once you go right-to-work you do not go back. >> that's right. it is one-way street. you know what? i guarantee you, it will not happen. once you've given this liberty to workers very hard to to take it away from them. bill: steve moore, thank you. "wall street journal" out of washington today. >> have a great day. alisyn: there are new signs that the assad regime in syria is growing increasely desperate as we hear reports of extreme escalation in violence. why the u.s. is watching --. bill: who did you like last night. did you like the boss or bon jovi? alisyn: can i say both? bill: they're both from new jersey, representing images on your screen. it was rock and roll royality, say that three times. coming together to help the victims of sandy and raising the roof and mi
to prevent the kind of crisis here that we have seen unfolding all across europe. republicans have engaged in these discussions in good faith. we have agreed to make tough choices. the question is where's the president? where is the president? where's the only man in the country who can make it happen? well, it appears that with just a couple of weeks left to resolve this crisis, he is busy moving the goal post. instead of leading as he was elected to do, he's out campaigning and playing games with the nation's future. so my sincere plea this morning is that the president gets serious, that he put the campaign behind him and lead. if he does, he will have willing partners. the first sign is seriousness, seriousness about spending cuts. now, madam president, on an entirely different matter, yesterday i began the difficult task of saying an early goodbye to now six members of our conference who will be leaving the senate at the end of the year, and this morning i'd like to say a few words about my friend and long-time colleague, senator snowe. she has devoted the last 40 years of her life to
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 72 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)